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Cheetah health check by vet

Cheetah Tracking Project – Cheetah Outreach Trust

Ubuntu Wildlife Trust will be funding the satellite tracking costs to enable Cheetah Outreach Trust to collect the invaluable data from the movements of the male cheetah. Our charity was keen to work with them on this project to support the conservation of cheetah. As a charity, we are passionate about raising awareness, educating and supporting communities who live alongside wildlife in Africa. We know the importance of reducing human-cheetah conflict to help support cheetah conservation and the farmers that depend on their livestock. We are looking to raise £500 to fund the satellite costs for 1 year and again the following year.
64% Donated
Goal : £500.00
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£322.00
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About this cause

UBUNTU WILDLIFE TRUST are pleased to announce they will be working with Cheetah Outreach Trust on their project, tracking the movements of a rescued and rehabilitated male cheetah. Ubuntu Wildlife Trust will be funding the satellite tracking costs and hope to raise £500 to cover the costs for 1 year and to repeat for a further 1 year. 

The Cheetah Outreach Trust is a non-profit conservation organisation dedicated to the protection of the free-ranging cheetah. The work of the Cheetah Outreach Trust is focused in four key areas: environmental education, reduction of wildlife-human conflict through applied and effective in situ (field-based) strategies, advocacy for the elimination of illegal trade using the South African Cheetah Studbook as a monitoring tool for legitimacy of animals traded and research. They have taken on the leading role for the conservation of the Southern African cheetah population that occurs outside of protected areas on farmlands in South Africa. 

The male cheetah is a free roaming cheetah that was caught in a gintrap on a farming area in the North West Province close to the Botswana border.  The Provincial Conservation Authority of the North West Province together with a private veterinarian rescued the cheetah from the gintrap. He was urgently taken to a very experienced veterinarian known for his specialised surgical skills and his severed ligaments and blood vessels were re-attached. He was then taken to the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre for temporary holding. After careful discussion with other relevant role-players in cheetah conservation as well as the Conservation Authority, it was agreed the cheetah was to be released back to the site he was rescued with a satellite collar. 

By Cheetah Outreach Trust fitting the male cheetah with a highly advanced satellite tracking collar, with other conservation role players, they can effectively monitor the movement of the cheetah and place conflict mitigation efforts in place to prevent or minimise conflict with intolerant farmers. Cheetah Outreach Trust also have a number of livestock guardian dogs in the area and the collar will give them a further insight into the movement of cheetah in an area where livestock guardian dogs are guarding livestock flocks. The data collected from the movement of the cheetah will also be made available to the farming community for them to understand the extent of the range of free roaming cheetah on farmland and into neighbouring Botswana.

Ubuntu Wildlife Trust will be funding the satellite tracking costs to enable Cheetah Outreach Trust to collect the invaluable data from the movements of the male cheetah. Our charity was keen to work with them on this project to support the conservation of cheetah. As a charity, we are passionate about raising awareness, educating and supporting communities who live alongside wildlife in Africa. We know the importance of reducing human-cheetah conflict to help support cheetah conservation and the farmers that depend on their livestock.

Any support is appreciated, no matter how small it may seem, any donation will be contributing to this important project and cheetah conservation. 



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Updates

October, 13 2020

Cause added. 
 
 

October, 20 2020

Today Cheetah Outreach Trust fitted the rescued and rehabilitated male cheetah with his satellite tracking collar. Once fitted the cheetah was successful released back into the wild. This wouldn’t of been possible without the hard work, quick thinking and dedication of all involved 👏🏼 a huge well done!
The data collected from the tracking collar will be used by Cheetah Outreach Trust for conflict mitigation, research on the effectiveness of livestock guardian dogs against predators whilst contributing to cheetah conservation.
 
With your support we will fund the satellite tracking costs, securing the project for two years,  to ensure valuable research data is recorded to help protect & conserve cheetah.

November, 17 2020

Cheetah Outreach Trust  field officer tracked and found the rescued and released Kalahari male cheetah and he appears to be doing well in the wild. 

Watch a short video recorded by the field officer: https://fb.watch/1SDgIlMQCC/

 

March, 23 2021

The male cheetah has been thriving since his release, Cheetah Outreach Trust has informed us that he ‘is doing well’. The data received from the tracking collar suggests the cheetah prefers the exciting life on the farmlands and not within the safety of the Nature reserve. 

Cheetah Outreach Trust is releasing a second collared cheetah in that area and will be collaring and releasing a female next week.