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Cheetah health check by vet

Cheetah Tracking Project – Cheetah Outreach Trust

Ubuntu Wildlife Trust will be funding the satellite tracking costs to enable Cheetah Outreach Trust to collect the invaluable data from the movements of the male cheetah. Our charity was keen to work with them on this project to support the conservation of cheetah. As a charity, we are passionate about raising awareness, educating and supporting communities who live alongside wildlife in Africa. We know the importance of reducing human-cheetah conflict to help support cheetah conservation and the farmers that depend on their livestock. We are looking to raise £500 to fund the satellite costs for 1 year and again the following year.
64% Donated
Goal : £500.00
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About this cause

UBUNTU WILDLIFE TRUST are pleased to announce they will be working with Cheetah Outreach Trust on their project, tracking the movements of a rescued and rehabilitated male cheetah. Ubuntu Wildlife Trust will be funding the satellite tracking costs and hope to raise £500 to cover the costs for 1 year and to repeat for a further 1 year. 

The Cheetah Outreach Trust is a non-profit conservation organisation dedicated to the protection of the free-ranging cheetah. The work of the Cheetah Outreach Trust is focused in four key areas: environmental education, reduction of wildlife-human conflict through applied and effective in situ (field-based) strategies, advocacy for the elimination of illegal trade using the South African Cheetah Studbook as a monitoring tool for legitimacy of animals traded and research. They have taken on the leading role for the conservation of the Southern African cheetah population that occurs outside of protected areas on farmlands in South Africa. 

The male cheetah is a free roaming cheetah that was caught in a gintrap on a farming area in the North West Province close to the Botswana border.  The Provincial Conservation Authority of the North West Province together with a private veterinarian rescued the cheetah from the gintrap. He was urgently taken to a very experienced veterinarian known for his specialised surgical skills and his severed ligaments and blood vessels were re-attached. He was then taken to the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre for temporary holding. After careful discussion with other relevant role-players in cheetah conservation as well as the Conservation Authority, it was agreed the cheetah was to be released back to the site he was rescued with a satellite collar. 

By Cheetah Outreach Trust fitting the male cheetah with a highly advanced satellite tracking collar, with other conservation role players, they can effectively monitor the movement of the cheetah and place conflict mitigation efforts in place to prevent or minimise conflict with intolerant farmers. Cheetah Outreach Trust also have a number of livestock guardian dogs in the area and the collar will give them a further insight into the movement of cheetah in an area where livestock guardian dogs are guarding livestock flocks. The data collected from the movement of the cheetah will also be made available to the farming community for them to understand the extent of the range of free roaming cheetah on farmland and into neighbouring Botswana.

Ubuntu Wildlife Trust will be funding the satellite tracking costs to enable Cheetah Outreach Trust to collect the invaluable data from the movements of the male cheetah. Our charity was keen to work with them on this project to support the conservation of cheetah. As a charity, we are passionate about raising awareness, educating and supporting communities who live alongside wildlife in Africa. We know the importance of reducing human-cheetah conflict to help support cheetah conservation and the farmers that depend on their livestock.

Any support is appreciated, no matter how small it may seem, any donation will be contributing to this important project and cheetah conservation. 



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Updates

October, 13 2020

Cause added. 
 
 

October, 20 2020

Today Cheetah Outreach Trust fitted the rescued and rehabilitated male cheetah with his satellite tracking collar. Once fitted the cheetah was successful released back into the wild. This wouldn’t of been possible without the hard work, quick thinking and dedication of all involved 👏🏼 a huge well done!
The data collected from the tracking collar will be used by Cheetah Outreach Trust for conflict mitigation, research on the effectiveness of livestock guardian dogs against predators whilst contributing to cheetah conservation.
 
With your support we will fund the satellite tracking costs, securing the project for two years,  to ensure valuable research data is recorded to help protect & conserve cheetah.

November, 17 2020

Cheetah Outreach Trust  field officer tracked and found the rescued and released Kalahari male cheetah and he appears to be doing well in the wild. 

Watch a short video recorded by the field officer: https://fb.watch/1SDgIlMQCC/

 

March, 23 2021

The male cheetah has been thriving since his release, Cheetah Outreach Trust has informed us that he ‘is doing well’. The data received from the tracking collar suggests the cheetah prefers the exciting life on the farmlands and not within the safety of the Nature reserve. 

Cheetah Outreach Trust is releasing a second collared cheetah in that area and will be collaring and releasing a female next week. 

July, 23 2021- Devastating news for our Cheetah

Snared cheetahPost by Cheetah Outreach Trust-
“The end of 2020 saw us collaring and releasing a cheetah male that was caught in a gin-trap. His injuries sustained were treated by Peter Caldwell of Old Chapel Veterinary Clinic and the costs of this were covered by Ashia Cheetah Conservation. The satellite collar was donated by Africa Wildlife Tracking and satellite download costs by Ubuntu Wildlife Trust. This cheetah was kept in holding at the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre – De Wildt. This proved that close cooperation between passionate NGO’s , Government Conservation Authorities and individuals could make a success to conserve cheetahs by learning more about the habits of free roaming cheetahs. The satellite collar recently provided with gps data that indicated that the collar was not moving. We anticipated that the collar might have come off the cheetah. We were devastated when rangers found the carcass of this magnificent cheetah male that had been moving over a huge area on the farmland area where he was released. All indications were that he was caught in a wire snare broke loose from it but that the injuries caused to his front leg by the snare caused the death of this cheetah. This is just a clear indication of the threats cheetahs face on farmland areas. Although this is a huge set back for our research monitoring project it also shows that the threats are real and we need to continue our conservation work on the free roaming cheetahs to change attitudes, address issues such as snaring and indiscriminate killing in order to secure the valuable habitat needed by these free roaming cheetahs that migrate between South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique to form the larger free roaming cheetah population in Southern Africa”. 

November , 19 2021 - Exciting News!

Cheetah health check before release

Cheetah being released

We love the work of the Cheetah Outreach Trust and help whenever we can – this time with the workings of a tracking collar for an injured free-roaming cheetah, “Kallie”, in the Kalahari. In a combined effort with the farming community and a local meerkat rehabilitation centre in Van Zylsrus the male cheetah was darted and on closer inspection it was found that the toe pads of his front feet were worn through to the skin which caused the cheetah incredible pain and the reason for him not moving away out of the road perimeter. The cheetah was taken to a specialist veterinarian, Dr Peter Caldwell at the Old Chapel Veterinary Clinic for treatment of the wounds where after he spent a few weeks at the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre to give his wounds time to heal. He was then moved to the Waterval Game Reserve for release into a wilding camp where he could be closely monitored and to see if he would be able to successfully hunt without the wounds opening up again.

February, 7 2022 - Kallie has recovered well!

We are very excited to share the news about Kallie the Kalahari cheetah.

Update from Deon Cilliers, project manager and field officer of the Cheetah Outreach Trust- Eastern cheetah range:

“Kallie has recovered very well from his injuries and he has proven to be quite a successful hunter and survivor on his own at the rewilding camp at Waterval Game Reserve near Kimberley in the Northern Cape Province. Kallie has returned back to the ways of a true wild cheetah and prefers to stay away and move away from human activity. The satellite collar data which Ubuntu Wildlife Trust has paid for has proven invaluable to monitor his movements and follow up on his kills. The next plan in the process to retune him to the wild is to capture him and move him to a protected areas close to Hoedspruit in the Limpopo Province. Here a female that has previously been introduced is waiting for him. Kallie will be placed in a holding boma at Blue Canyon Private game Reserve to get accustomed to his new environment and will then be released after a period of a month into the larger Blue Canyon Reserve. Kallie will hopefully mate with the female cheetah that is already there and his valuable genetics will then be moved through his offspring to other cheetah range expansion reserves in Southern Africa. As a wild free roaming cheetah which is unrelated to the current genetic make-up of cheetahs within the range expansion network of reserves, Kallie’s genetics will add very needed genetics to diversify the current cheetah population within this network of protected areas”.

 “We are very grateful towards Ubuntu Wildlife Trust for the continued support to ensure that Kallie returns to the wild where he belongs. We are also very grateful towards Ashia Cheetah Conservation and Waterval Private Game Reserve for the support in the entire re-wilding process”. 

February, 22 2022 - Recovered and relocated!

The male cheetah that was rescued by the Cheetah Outreach Trust, next to the road in the Van Zylsrus area of the Kalahari in the Northern Cape. Kallie the Kalahari cheetah completed his rewilding period at Waterval Private Game Reserve as part of the Ashia Cheetah Conservation Rewilding project.
 
From Cheetah Outreach Trust, “In normal situations free roaming cheetahs are returned back to the farmland areas as soon as possible to prevent habitation to human activities. In the case of Kallie he was treated and kept in temporary holding for an extensive period to give his wounds time to heal before he was moved to the rewilding camps under Ashia Cheetah Conservation where he proved that he was hunting and surviving as well as any other wild cheetah and that his injuries did not have an impact on his survival skills. As a precaution and to prevent unnecessary possible conflict with farmers as a free roaming cheetah, it was decided to relocate him into a managed cheetah metapopulation under the EWT Cheetah Range Expansion Project where he could contribute towards the genetic diversity of this specific cheetah population.”
 
Kallie was relocated to the Moditlo Private Game Reserve where he will be adding his valuable genes to the cheetah metapopulation in South Africa. This was an incredible team effort starting with the farming community in the Northern Cape Van Zylsrus area Solidearth Meerkat Rehab and Rescue , Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre – De Wildt , Ashia Cheetah Conservation, our charity, Ubuntu Wildlife Trust and the Cheetah Outreach Trust.
 
We are extremely proud and honoured to have contributed to this highly important and valuable project.
 
Photo credits to @Marinda Cilliers
kallie cheetah relocated Cheetah relocated
Please visit the Cheetah Outreach Trust’s website at www.cheetahoutreachtrust.co.za for more about their conservation work.